WILLIAM VLCEK

Senior Lecturer in Global Political Economy

School of IR profile

Pillars: trade and development; peace and security

Keywords: global financial governance; offshore finance; international taxation; terrorist finance; money laundering; mobile money

BIO

Bill joined the School of International Relations in 2009 to teach International Political Economy, and his research explores questions of money and finance in the global political economy. In addition to offshore finance and international taxation, it includes the intersections of finance and security found with money laundering, terrorist finance and sovereign debt. While claiming to be theoretically agnostic, there is a strong current of poststructuralism present in his publications with the application of Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari to interrogate the operation of power in global finance.

He previously taught at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London on its MSc in Globalisation and Development, and prior to that while a PhD student contributed to the European Commission Sixth Framework Research Programme funded multi-university project – CHALLENGE, The Changing Landscape of European Liberty and Security (2004 – 2006). In April-May 2017, he was a Visiting Professor of International Relations with the Graduate Program in International Relations at the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (PUC Minas), Belo Horizonte, Brazil. He received his PhD in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2006.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

‘The IPE of Money Laundering and Terrorist Finance’ in The Routledge Handbook to International Political Economy: Conversations and Inquiries, 2020 ed., Ernesto Vivares, ed., Routledge.

‘Drowning the Greek Economy: Injurious Speech and Sovereign Debt’, co-authored with Faye Donnelly, Finance and Society, vol. 3, no. 1 (2017): 51 – 71.

Offshore Finance and Global Governance: Disciplining the Tax Nomad, in the Palgrave Macmillan International Political Economy series (2017).

‘From Road Town to Shanghai: situating the Caribbean in global capital flows to China’, The British Journal of Politics and International Relations, vol. 16, no. 3 (2014): 534 – 553.

‘Crafting human rights in a constitution: Gay rights in the Cayman Islands and the limits to global norm diffusion’, Global Constitutionalism, vol. 2, no. 3 (2013): 345 – 372.

‘Power and the practice of security to govern global finance’, Review of International Political Economy, vol. 19, no. 4 (2012): 639 – 662.

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